Review: Rarity from the Hollow | Uhhh…Come Again?!?!

Title: Rarity from the Hollow

Author: Robert Eggleton

Publisher: Dog Horn

Publication Date: November 3, 2016

Genre: Adult Fiction, Child Abuse, Mental Illness

Rating: 2.5 Stars

I was recently sent Rarity from the Hollow from the author, Robert Eggleton in exchange for an honest review.

Dear fellow Babblers,

I’m disturbed. I’m perplexed. I’m just confused. Like seriously. What in the great land of big foot’s name did I just read ? This story goes back and forth, up and down, sideways, vertical – in every possible direction you can imagine with little time to catch up or even get a grasp on what’s going on. A book which could have potentially been such a masterpiece, giving a realistic account of child abuse and the obstacles of childhood has let me down. From the very beginning this is a bizarre work of fiction that I cannot say I would recommend to anyone to read.  Continue reading “Review: Rarity from the Hollow | Uhhh…Come Again?!?!”

Review: The Perks of Being a Wallflower | The Perks of This Wallflower

Title: The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Author: Stephan Chbosky

Publisher: MTV Books and Pocket Books

Publication Date: February 1, 1999

Genre: Coming-of-Age, Mental Illness

Rating: 5 Stars

Dear fellow Babblers,

It’s very rare that I go about writing a review on a classic, or a book that was published over ten years ago. Such books don’t really need the marketing or to be written about on blogs, nor do readers really go about scouring the internet for pointless nonsense on books already sitting and collecting dust in bookstores. Also, I don’t often read the same book from front to back over and over and over again. I’ve always believed that there is so many wonderful characters and worlds out there to discover that lingering more than necessary over one means to sacrifice all the others. That was all before I fell into Charlie’s backwards world in Stephen Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower.

I was roaming around the shops during my vacation in Milan back in October when I came across an English bookshop tucked away in one of those tiny shops that are impossible ever to find again. Nothing really drew me to the book I just saw it sitting on a crowded table along with all our other American authors – Steinbeck, Sinclair, Twain, the list goes on and on.

So here I am over a month later on my way to writing a review of The Perks of Being a Wallflower. No, it did not take me that long to finish the book. The thing is, I read and reread the book from start to finish three times since. This is no exaggeration. The book and its characters has really touched me heart during a time in my life that I feel myself slipping away and unfamiliar with the soul taking over.  Continue reading “Review: The Perks of Being a Wallflower | The Perks of This Wallflower”

Review: Girl in Pieces | Portrait of a Sad Girl

Title: Girl in Pieces

Author: Kathleen Glasgow

Publisher: Delacorte Press

Publication Date: August 30, 2016

Genre: Young Adult, Mental Illness

Rating: 4 Stars

Dear fellow Babblers,

This is a morbid story from the first page. Everything that happens is bad and rawly portrayed. There is no romanticization or good here. I was initially intrigued by the synopsis but was by no means prepared for what I read. This book was just so much to digest and take in, I had to put it down multiple times just to process the overwhelming darkness blanketing each page. Mental illness, suicide, self-harm, rape, love, abuse are all ever so evocatively described. Literally everything that happens in this book is a trigger for an even greater disaster than the one that preceded it. This book shows what happens when too much happens too quickly. Life becomes difficult to bear and an entrapping nightmare that blurs one’s perceptions of reality and the reality of their minds.  Continue reading “Review: Girl in Pieces | Portrait of a Sad Girl”

Where Delphine Be At + Book Aesthetics Tag

Dear fellow Babblers,

I’ve been an awfully terrible blogger these past few months. After the high and excitement went away regarding my new home in France I quickly fell into a long, dreary and dark wave of depression that resulted in nostalgia and ended with complete and utter helplessness. So finding the motivation to blog and even read, which has always picked up my spirits before, has been hard, if not impossible – hence my lack of activity here on wordpress lately. I find it fascinating how we can go from joy to grief in such a short and abrupt amount of time and we often have no idea what triggers this. I mean, I love it here in the Burgundy region. I really do. But it has not wiped away the problems I had back in Los Angeles – it only masked them for a while. And now ? They are all coming back to the surface. I ran away from my problems. I packed my bags and came to France in hopes that I could forget everything that happened a few years ago. Life doesn’t work that way though and now I’m more lost than ever in a place far from everything I’ve ever known. I’m sad. But I’m a hopeful kind of sad. The sort of sad that just takes time. Soon everything will get better, I still have faith…  Continue reading “Where Delphine Be At + Book Aesthetics Tag”

ARC Review: Alone | Bizarrely, Dreadfully Illusive

Title: Alone

Author: Cyn Balog

Publisher: Sourcebooks Fire

Publication Date: November 7, 2017

Genre: Young Adult, Mystery, Suspense

Rating: 4 Stars

I received an ARC copy of Alone in exchange for an honest review. Thanks goes to NetGalley as well as Sourcebooks Fire Books for this advanced copy which was recently released on November 7, 2017. Also, my apologies to NetGalley, the publisher and the author, Cyn Balog for the late posting of my review.

Dear fellow Babblers,

Alone by Cyn Balog is altogether thrilling, curious and strangely beautiful. Balog goes beyond authors to create a story that leaves readers puzzled, relieved, frightened, traumatized. The plot is unheard of. The writing style is quick paced and slow to climax; a paradox yes, a mistake no. The characters are disastrous and unknowingly on their way to their fate. The feelings provoked are doubt, sympathy hatred for things unseen. This chilling tale starts with the disturbing infatuation of a mother who inherits and old mansion, affecting her children’s contact with the outside world, especially her teenage daughter, Seda. Through Seda’s eyes we are trapped within the creaking rooms and dusty exterior of this place she fears she must now call home. All is sad, but quaintly uneventful until a group of friends lose their direction on their way to a winter resort. When these teens enter the mansion seeking safety, it is without pause that they enter a faraway, yet so close universe where fun is mixed with fear, and life becomes death.  Continue reading “ARC Review: Alone | Bizarrely, Dreadfully Illusive”

Author Interview: Auriel Roe

Dear fellow Babblers,

As I have not been as active on my blog as much as I would like lately due to my move to a new country, new job, new language – new life. I have been living here in France for about two months now and now that the absolute excitement and amazement is wearing away and real life is taking its place I often find myself a bit lonely and dreamy. In moments like these, I often think of recent books I’ve enjoyed and the characters whom I’ve grown to love. I’m sure my babblers out there know that feeling. When you feel completely and utterly lost in this world we are supposed to call real, but in our minds that “real” world is the inked universe between those sometimes clean, most times dusty pages.

And then when we reach those last pages of an intensely entrancing read? There is no sense of accomplishment here, but rather a sense of longing for more of this other world, beyond the scopes of our own imagination, connecting us with the writer behind it.

Such describes my feelings towards A Blindefellows Chronicle by Auriel Roe. Being her first published book, I was instantly mesmerized by the characters, happenings and stylistic techniques that brought together this novel. At the same time comic and dramatic, A Blindefellows Chronicle has become more than a physical object for me. It has become another place I can go in the back of my mind when life overwhelms me and I just need to go elsewhere, if even for a few moments, or a few pages in this sense.

Roe is currently an artist, but is heading closer and closer to a full-time career as a writer. A writer myself, Roe’s decision inspires me beyond all reason. To never let go of that “other life” – the one where your heart leads you and only then, the rest of you follows.

I had the amazing opportunity to interview Roe about her life as a writer, the thoughts, feelings and processes behind A Blindefellows Chronicle along with a set of questions that may be helpful for our up-and-coming authors out there. You can read my full review of A Blindefellows Chronicle here. My discussion with Roe has been empowering for myself and I hope the same can be said for anyone out there – writers, artists, athletes whose grasp is torn between logic and passion…  Continue reading “Author Interview: Auriel Roe”

Review: The Sacrifice | Delphine’s Sacrificial Review

Title: The Sacrifice

Author: Indrajit Garai

Publisher: Self-Published

Publication Date: August 25, 2016

Genre: Short Story

Rating: 2 Stars

Dear fellow Babblers,

I was given a copy of Volume 1 of the collection of short stories, The Sacrifice by a friend of the author, Indrajit Garai in exchange for an honest review. These quick three stories are exactly as the title of the volume entails: stories of sacrifice. Each tale revolves around a troubled character who must ultimately make the greatest sacrifices, including his or her happiness for that of loved ones. This has been done before by countless authors – Dickens, Sartre, Murakami. These are all big names in the publishing industry so unless a writer can really create something uniquely thrilling and thought-provoking with the theme of sacrifice it is unlikely that it will be worth picking up. Being his first work of fiction all three of Garai’s stories were rooted and thorough. But when does clarity and focus damage the overall impact of a book? That is hard to tell. With The Sacrifice, this is exactly how I felt, explaining why for me this was a sacrificial read, not at all pleasing.  Continue reading “Review: The Sacrifice | Delphine’s Sacrificial Review”

Life Update Part 3: Delphine et la France

Dear fellow Babblers,

One last post to conclude my Life Update series on relocating to France.
If any of you have read the two earlier posts, you’ll well be aware that I am no longer living in the states and I am writing these posts as a way of somehow connecting with the world as well as reflecting on my initial impressions and thoughts of my new home here in Joigny, on the outskirts of Paris. These posts are written as I wait to be finally connected to the wifi. I haven’t had internet connection here for the past three weeks, and being a blogger and a gal trying to fill out grad school applications just let me tell ya that it’s pretty killer. However, this post is the first written in which I have Wifi so you can only imagine my relief and utter gratitude for the bimbo technician that finally came along to connect the bastard.

Anyway. This post is going to be devoted to my new work as an assistant English teacher at the local high school, where I am also currently living, and some new discoveries I have been making of myself as I begin to perceive the world around me under a different sunlight and moonlight. Continue reading “Life Update Part 3: Delphine et la France”