Review: Sad Girls | Let’s babble beginnings

34023590Title: Sad Girls.

Author: Lang Leav

Publisher: Andrew McMeel Publishing.

Publication Date: May 30, 2017

Rating: 5 Stars

 

 

” Your first love isn’t the first person you give your heart to – it’s the first one who breaks it “.

Dear fellow babblers,

Shall we attempt a babble on Lang Leav’s Sad Girls ?

No? Not even though we have all read the latest sad, contemporary poetry? Love & Misadventure (2013) ?  Lullabies (2014) ? Memories (2015) ? The Universe of Us (2016) ?
Not even because it’s the first novel written by the international bestselling author?
Still no fellow babblers out there? Guess I’m to babble to myself on this one, as is usually the case (enjoy Game of Thrones as I meditate here).

Lets begin at the beginning. And why not media reis? Because Sad Girls is all about beginnings.

Goodreads Review:

“Your first love isn’t the first person you give your heart to—it’s the first one who breaks it.”

Sad Girls is the much anticipated debut novel from international best-selling author Lang Leav. A beautifully written and emotionally charged coming of age story, where young love, dark secrets, and tragedy collide.

School is almost out for Audrey, but the panic attacks are just beginning. Because Audrey told a lie and now her classmate, Ana, is dead. Just as her world begins to spin out of control, Audrey meets the enigmatic Rad—the boy who could turn it all around. But will their ill-timed romance drive her closer to the edge?

Babbles: 

Eighteen-year-old Audrey’s panic attacks are only the beginning of a spiraling whirlpool of cryptic events. The first happens on the night of a death and grow like a bad seed giving birth to a meadow of poisonous mushrooms. Point of congruence? One very light, yet dark (lets imagine inescapable and foggy) red lie. A light and dark red lie told by Audrey to her two best friends, Lucy and Candela about a suicidal classmate – lets call her Ana. This light and dark red lie reaches Candela’s younger sister, Eve’s ears and soon turns into a fatal rumor leading up to Ana’s suicide, always a sad and mysterious girl whose ideas of fun is a test of keeping and losing one’s own life. Her suicide is a result of a rumor. Yes, it must have been suicide, we has found in the bathroom in her own pool of blood with slits on her wrist. It could only have been a suicide. Yes, yes. No other reason could have resulted in her death. Yes, yes. Suicide. This Sad Girl committed suicide. Ode to all: Never fall for a Sad Girl.

Ana’s funeral is the beginning of an inevitable romance between Audrey and Ana’s boyfriend Rad. Inevitable because both guard a very light, yet dark secret – we know Audrey’s, but what of Rad’s? He was the last to have been seen with Ana as he left her house after a heated argument about the rumor. What happened in between that time. How can one be sure it was a suicide. Our proximity to certainty can only be realized in Rad.

With beguiling twists, an inept affair of the heart, and two light, yet dark secrets that bring a Sad Girl and an evasive young writer together, Lang Leav’s debut is both chilling and emotionally animated. These light, yet dark lies that begin Audrey and Rad’s romance are exactly what bounds them together as they become inseparable and seemingly one in their sadness. The beginnings of a Sad Girl are the endings of a light, yet dark secret, and an eternity of a light, yet dark romance.

Do I recommend Sad Girls to you (who is you anyway? ) fellow babblers? Fellow Game of Thrones nerds? Sad Girls? Readers? Mysterious boys? I recommend to all babblers who look for a truthful coming-of-age story that explores all that we have experienced in our own lives – love, obsession, evasion – yet with a startling and eerie inception.

sad cat giphy

Yours Truly,

Read Sad Girl? Did ya love? Abhor? Fell somewhere in the midst of love and abhor? Wanna babble? Comment below and begin a babble!

(Image credit goes to Google).

16 thoughts on “Review: Sad Girls | Let’s babble beginnings

  1. It’s now on my list,but I’m not sure if I will like it because, honestly speaking, I did not appreciate some of her first best-selling books. I just wonder which genre she is better at. 😉

    Like

    1. Hmm, I personally think it’s extremely difficult and risky for authors to switch mediums abruptly especially from poetry to the novel, which did not have the best consequences for Leav. Her poetry, I think, is so fluid and descriptive, but the novel goes in a totally different direction.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. On the contrary, what matters after all is that Leav is a skilled writer; she can do both genres. And I look up to writers like her. However, the big challenge for her, I guess, is how to gain her avid readers’ respect since literature is now all about money, which she must have done already since her first best-selling books have been the springboard for that literary pedestal! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Amazing book. It has gotten some harsh criticism. Since the author, Lang Leav, is originally a poet, most readers have expected the novel to be just as illusory and descriptive but the heavy dialogue and minimalist narration is a total switch. The plot twists and shocking ending though, at least for me, made up for all that jazz :).
      Thanks for commenting, hope you enjoy Sad Girls if you get the chance to read it!

      Liked by 2 people

  2. I’ll definitely have to check out this book further! Thanks for introducing it to me, and for a lovely review.

    I’m new to blogging and book reviewing, and I was wondering if you had any tips for newbie bloggers and book reviewers.

    If you have the time, please check out my blog @breenysbooks. I’d love any feedback. Have a wonderful day.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi! Thank you for visiting my site! I highly recommend Sad Girls. But, let me warn you that it has not received as good of reviews as Leav’s poetry such as Memories and Lullabies, but nonetheless it is a wonderful, quick read for anyone looking to get back into YA! 🙂
      Same here, I’m a newbie myself so we can definitely babble further about book reviewing and how we can traverse without getting lost in the blog world. So far, I’ve been trying to communicate with other book bloggers and add several comments all over their posts as a way of spreading my thoughts about certain books and reading in general. This, I discovered, encourages other bloggers to visit myself as well.

      Liked by 1 person

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